Disgraced’ Birmingham fails to recruit social workers

More than a quarter of Birmingham’s frontline social worker posts are unfilled, city council figures show.

Recruitment drives have failed to reduce vacancies in the department branded a “disgrace” by watchdog Ofsted and rated inadequate since 2009.

 

via BBC News – ‘Disgraced’ Birmingham fails to recruit social workers.

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The amazing family who rescued a rejected, sick and suicidal gay teen

The amazing family who rescued a rejected, sick and suicidal gay teen. His birth father beat him at times and also neglected him at other times he did not have an easy life at all

He had to keep his sexuality a secret and he was raised with a belief that gay people were not only sinners, they were sin itself. His birth father also made sure Corey was aware gay people were killed at some point before they reached old age.

This is so stupid in my opinion all just because he is gay people shouldn’t be treated less like humans for  simply  being of a different sexuality then their parents/family/friends

People shouldn’t be treated less like humans for simply being of a different sexuality then their parents/family/friends – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
People shouldn’t be treated less like humans for simply being of a different sexuality then their parents/family/friends – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey was raised with a belief gay people were not only sinners, they were sin itself. His birth father made sure Corey was aware gay people all were killed at some point before they reached old age. – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf

Corey did not have an easy life. He was a popular jock guy in high school, but by the age of 15, he had been handed more than his share of abuse.

His parents were conservative, religious, on welfare and dabbled in narcotics. His birth father beat Corey at times, and neglected him at others. Corey was raised with a belief gay people were not only sinners, they were sin itself. His birth father made sure Corey was aware gay people all were killed at some point before they reached old age.

Corey had been meticulous about keeping his sexual orientation a secret. He was athletic and popular as a ‘ladies man’

– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf

Corey did not have an easy life. He was a popular jock guy in high school, but by the age of 15, he had been handed more than his share of abuse.

His parents were conservative, religious, on welfare and dabbled in narcotics. His birth father beat Corey at times, and neglected him at others. Corey was raised with a belief gay people were not only sinners, they were sin itself. His birth father made sure Corey was aware gay people all were killed at some point before they reached old age.

Corey had been meticulous about keeping his sexual orientation a secret. He was athletic and popular as a ‘ladies man’

– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf

Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf
Corey, 15, was sick with pneumonia and suicidal when he was rescued from his birth family by his mom and sister-to-be – See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/amazing-family-who-rescued-rejected-sick-and-suicidal-gay-teen250314#sthash.bhwh63ws.dpuf

via The amazing family who rescued a rejected, sick and suicidal gay teen | Gay Star News.

Child abuse and neglect rise with income inequality

Nearly 3 million children are abused physically, sexually or emotionally or are physically neglected each year in the United States.

In the aftermath of the Great Recession in the US and the increased attention to the widening income gap, concern over the impact of inequality on children and families has risen. According to a nationwide study by Cornell researchers, the list of bad outcomes associated with income inequality now includes child abuse and neglect.

The income inequality-child maltreatment study, covering all 3,142 US counties from 2005 to 2009, is said to be the most comprehensive of its kind and the first to link higher risk of child maltreatment to localities where the gap between rich and poor is greatest.

“More equal societies, states and communities have fewer health and social problems than less equal ones – that much was known. Our study extends the list of unfavorable child outcomes associated with income inequality to include child abuse and neglect,” said John Eckenrode, professor of human development and director of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research in the College of Human Ecology.

Results of the nationwide study were published in the Feb. 10 online edition of the journal Pediatrics as “Income Inequality and Child Maltreatment in the United States.” In addition to Eckenrode, who directs the National Data Archive of Child Abuse and Neglect, other report authors include Elliott Smith, Margaret McCarthy and Michael Dineen, researchers in Cornell’s Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

Nearly 3 million children younger than 18 years of age are abused physically, sexually or emotionally or are physically neglected each year in the United States, the Cornell researchers noted. That is about 4 percent of the youth population.

“We have known for some time that poverty is one of the strongest precursors of child abuse and neglect,” Eckenrode said. “In this paper we were also interested in areas with wide variations in income – think of counties encompassing affluent suburbs and impoverished inner cities – and in the U.S. there is quite a lot of variation in inequality from county to county and state to state.”

The damage inflicted on children by maltreatment doesn’t stop when kids graduate – if they do – from school, the Cornell researchers observed.

“Child maltreatment is a toxic stressor in the lives of children that may result in childhood mortality and morbidities and have lifelong effects on leading causes of death in adults,” they wrote. “This is in addition to long-term effects on mental health, substance use, risky sexual behavior and criminal behavior … increased rates of unemployment, poverty and Medicaid use in adulthood.” Eckenrode noted that “reducing poverty and inequality would be the single most effective way to prevent maltreatment of children, but in addition there are proven programs that work to support parents and children and help to reduce the chances of abuse and neglect – clearly a multifaceted strategy is needed.” Cornell Chronicle

Search warrant: Springfield child abuse case says 3-year-old girl was starving, hurt, kept in cage

Starving and sick, covered in cuts and bruises, her hair thinning — the 3-year-old girl, according to doctors, could have died.
Interviews documented by police also allege the Springfield girl had been tied to a chair and thrown down stairs by her mother’s boyfriend. She was at times allegedly kept in a part of the house the other children called the “hole,” locked in a cage.
Her mom, according to documents, sometimes went to “the hole” to sneak her spinach and watermelon.
The allegations in the documents were used to OK a police search of a home at 1521 W. Florida St., Springfield, and are filed in Greene County Circuit Court.

But an attorney for the couple says the allegations aren’t true.
Kyle Wyatt, who represents Dustin Richard and Kaylah Hill, said he will argue during an upcoming child welfare hearing through the state Children’s Division that there was no abuse.
Child welfare authorities have been involved in the case for some time, but only after the 3-year-old’s maternal grandmother took her to the hospital in December did police begin to investigate.
No one has been criminally charged in this case, but welfare authorities have removed six children from the home. And, as the investigation nears its end, police say they plan to submit probable cause to prosecutors to push for criminal charges, possibly within a week.
Documents from a search warrant say Richard and Hill already had 15 open cases and an “extensive history” with the Children’s Division before the 3-year-old’s condition resulted in police being called to a Springfield emergency room. Documents say doctors diagnosed her with the conditions described above along with cellulitis and a disease called Kwashiorkor, caused by malnutrition.
Defending the couple in an interview with the News-Leader, attorney Wyatt said doctors never diagnosed the girl with Kwashiorkor, and that test results showed the girl was in the 75th percentile for weight. He said the cellulitis is not a sign of abuse.
It was the cellulitis that had the highest likelihood of causing death, doctors said, had it spread from her feet to her abdomen.
According to the documents, police were called to Mercy hospital on Dec. 26 when the girl arrived in the emergency room. An investigator described her as “scared and withdrawn.”
The girl was taken to the intensive care unit where she stayed until New Year’s Eve. She was placed in the state’s custody upon leaving the hospital.
The girl allegedly told investigators her mother’s boyfriend had tied her to a chair and thrown her down the stairs. According to documents, she said a mark on her forehead was from her mother hurting her.
She also, according to documents, described Richard tying her to a board.
The grandmother, Adele Hill, told police, according to documents, that the girl told her about Richard pushing her down the stairs in a chair. The girl had been “eating non-stop” since she’d been at the grandmother’s house the day before, the grandmother said.
Attempts by the News-Leader to reach Adele Hill failed.
Investigators got more information in later interviews from other children who had been with the girl in the Florida Street home. The allegations included:
• Richard hits the girl and hurts her.
• The girl and another child don’t get food “all the time” and not at all when they “get in trouble.”
• Hill sometimes gives the children food but they can’t tell Richard.
• Richard puts the girl in a cage in a place called “the hole,” and “she cries all night while she is in the cage.”
• The girl’s hair fell out when she brushed it.
Asked about the allegations of a “cage,” Wyatt said police searched the home and found no cage.
“They aren’t running a kennel for children,” he said.
Before the girl arrived at the hospital, police had not started an investigation but officials from the Children’s Division had already been trying to find out more about the parenting of Richard and Hill. Child welfare workers had interviewed a 7-year-old boy, who is legally blind and who lived in the home.
Search warrant documents say suspicions arose in November when school officials told the Children’s Division the boy would eat “three or four breakfasts and lunch at school” because he said he didn’t get food at his mother’s house.
He said he had stayed up late the night before to write sentences — why is not clear in documents — and that the boyfriend had “put a sock in his mouth because he was crying,” police say.
In December, he told officials he didn’t get food one weekend and that he only eats at school. He said Richard had hit him in the testicles with a cane, according to documents.
In January, the 7-year-old allegedly told investigators that his mother and Richard told him “to tell lies” when questioned at the Child Advocacy Center, where children are often interviewed during Springfield child abuse investigations.
Documents show at least four different Children’s Division investigators working on cases with the family since November.
When police interviewed Hill and Richard in January, they allegedly described illnesses the girl had been diagnosed with months before she was taken to the hospital, but said they didn’t know how she had injured her feet, why there were bruises on her throat, or why she was malnourished.
Richard allegedly told police the cellulitis may have been caused by the impetigo the girl was diagnosed with, but a doctor later told police that was not possible. Impetigo is a skin infection often caused by a sore or rash that is scratched repeatedly.
According to documents, the couple said the back injuries were from a time she fell while camping. The bruises on her forehead and lips were from a fall down the stairs. A burn on her ear was from “falling into a hot turkey fryer on Thanksgiving.”
Police say Richard denied tying the girl to a chair and pushing her down the stairs.
Wyatt said Richard and Hill have been cooperative through the process and voluntarily met with a police investigator.
Police served a search warrant at the couple’s home Feb. 4 in order to take photos for evidence. The search warrant affidavit says police were specifically looking for “items used in disciplining and corporal punishment” such as “weapons, cages and restraints.”
Police did take photos, according to the search warrant return, but the document does not specify what is captured in the photos or how many were taken.
Documents say the 3-year-old was put in the state’s custody following her release from the hospital. Five other children in the home were later removed and taken into the state’s custody, according to Perry Epperly, chief juvenile officer in Greene County.
Wyatt said his clients will be seeking to have the children returned during the upcoming Children’s Division hearing, Feb. 19.
It’s unclear if the 3-year-old has had a birthday since being taken to the hospital, as she is sometimes referred to as being 4.
The document lists eight children who were living in the home, between the ages of less than a year and 10 years old. Wyatt said two of those children are not full-time residents of the home, so they were not taken into custody with the other six.

Child abuse resulting in death

A list of articles whose child subject has either been killed through abuse or whose subject has been involved in child abuse resulting in death.

The following 50 pages are in this category, out of 50 total. This list may not reflect recent changes

A

B

C

D

E

F

F cont.

G

I

J

K

L

M

N

N cont.

O

P

R

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W

Increase in child abuse and neglect referrals in Wakefield

The number of abuse and neglect cases being referred to police and social services by the NSPCC in Wakefield has increased.
During the past year the charity has referred 153 cases involving children, compared to 145 for the previous 12 months, after calls to its free helpline.
And across West Yorkshire there was an increase from 843 to 1024.
John Cameron, head of the NSPCC helpline, said: “These figures do not necessarily represent more abuse or neglect in the region, but are likely to show that people are more willing to take action and pick up the phone following recent shocking cases.
“It’s encouraging that people feel they have a responsibility for vulnerable children and are acting to report their concerns. We urge the public and professionals to continue to act on their instincts when they feel something could be wrong, and not wait until they are certain.
“We work closely with local authorities who take the next, vital step in protecting these children and we want to support and advise anyone working with children and enable them to take urgent action when necessary. It’s extremely worrying that nationally half of our referrals involve children under five, including babies, who rely on adults to speak out on their behalf.”

Anyone worried about a child should contact the 24-hour, free NSPCC helpline on 0808 800 5000, text 88858 or email help@nspcc.org.uk
Calls can be anonymous.

Myths and facts about child abuse and neglect

MYTH #1: It’s only abuse if it’s violent.
Fact: Physical abuse is just one type of child abuse. Neglect and emotional abuse can be just as damaging, and since they are more subtle, others are less likely to intervene.

MYTH #2: Only bad people abuse their children.
Fact: While it’s easy to say that only “bad people” abuse their children, it’s not always so black and white. Not all abusers are intentionally harming their children. Many have been victims of abuse themselves, and don’t know any other way to parent. Others may be struggling with mental health issues or a substance abuse problem.

MYTH #3: Child abuse doesn’t happen in “good” families.
Fact: Child abuse doesn’t only happen in poor families or bad neighborhoods. It crosses all racial, economic, and cultural lines. Sometimes, families who seem to have it all from the outside are hiding a different story behind closed doors.

MYTH #4: Most child abusers are strangers.
Fact: While abuse by strangers does happen, most abusers are family members or others close to the family.

MYTH #5: Abused children always grow up to be abusers.
Fact: It is true that abused children are more likely to repeat the cycle as adults, unconsciously repeating what they experienced as children. On the other hand, many adult survivors of child abuse have a strong motivation to protect their children against what they went through and become excellent parents.

Warning signs of child abuse and neglect

The earlier child abuse is caught, the better the chance of recovery and appropriate treatment for the child. Child abuse is not always obvious. By learning some of the common warning signs of child abuse and neglect, you can catch the problem as early as possible and get both the child and the abuser the help that they need.Of course, just because you see a warning sign doesn’t automatically mean a child is being abused. It’s important to dig deeper, looking for a pattern of abusive behavior and warning signs, if you notice something off.

Warning signs of emotional abuse in children

  • Excessively withdrawn, fearful, or anxious about doing something wrong.
  • Shows extremes in behavior (extremely compliant or extremely demanding; extremely passive or extremely aggressive).
  • Doesn’t seem to be attached to the parent or caregiver.
  • Acts either inappropriately adult (taking care of other children) or inappropriately infantile (rocking, thumb-sucking, throwing tantrums).

Warning signs of physical abuse in children

  • Frequent injuries or unexplained bruises, welts, or cuts.
  • Is always watchful and “on alert,” as if waiting for something bad to happen.
  • Injuries appear to have a pattern such as marks from a hand or belt.
  • Shies away from touch, flinches at sudden movements, or seems afraid to go home.
  • Wears inappropriate clothing to cover up injuries, such as long-sleeved shirts on hot days.

Warning signs of neglect in children

  • Clothes are ill-fitting, filthy, or inappropriate for the weather.
  • Hygiene is consistently bad (unbathed, matted and unwashed hair, noticeable body odor).
  • Untreated illnesses and physical injuries.
  • Is frequently unsupervised or left alone or allowed to play in unsafe situations and environments.
  • Is frequently late or missing from school.

Warning signs of sexual abuse in children

  • Trouble walking or sitting.
  • Displays knowledge or interest in sexual acts inappropriate to his or her age, or even seductive behavior.
  • Makes strong efforts to avoid a specific person, without an obvious reason.
  • Doesn’t want to change clothes in front of others or participate in physical activities.
  • An STD or pregnancy, especially under the age of 14.
  • Runs away from home.

Reporting child abuse and neglect

If you suspect a child is being abused, it’s critical to get them the help he or she needs. Reporting child abuse seems so official. Many people are reluctant to get involved in other families’ lives.
Understanding some of the myths behind reporting may help put your mind at ease if you need to report child abuse.
  • I don’t want to interfere in someone else’s family. The effects of child abuse are lifelong, affecting future relationships, self-esteem, and sadly putting even more children at risk of abuse as the cycle continues. Help break the cycle of child abuse.
  • What if I break up someone’s home? The priority in child protective services is keeping children in the home. A child abuse report does not mean a child is automatically removed from the home – unless the child is clearly in danger. Support such as parenting classes, anger management or other resources may be offered first to parents if safe for the child.
  • They will know it was me who called. Reporting is anonymous. In most places, you do not have to give your name when you report child abuse. The child abuser cannot find out who made the report of child abuse.
  • It won’t make a difference what I have to say. If you have a gut feeling that something is wrong, it is better to be safe than sorry. Even if you don’t see the whole picture, others may have noticed as well, and a pattern can help identify child abuse that might have otherwise slipped through the cracks.

Helping an abused or neglected child

What should you do if you suspect that a child has been abused? How do you approach him or her? Or what if a child comes to you? It’s normal to feel a little overwhelmed and confused in this situation. Child abuse is a difficult subject that can be hard to accept and even harder to talk about.

Just remember, you can make a tremendous difference in the life of an abused child, especially if you take steps to stop the abuse early. When talking with an abused child, the best thing you can provide is calm reassurance and unconditional support. Let your actions speak for you if you’re having trouble finding the words. Remember that talking about the abuse may be very difficult for the child. It’s your job to reassure the child and provide whatever help you can.

Tips for talking to an abused child

  • Avoid denial and remain calm. A common reaction to news as unpleasant and shocking as child abuse is denial. However, if you display denial to a child, or show shock or disgust at what they are saying, the child may be afraid to continue and will shut down. As hard as it may be, remain as calm and reassuring as you can.
  • Don’t interrogate. Let the child explain to you in his or her own words what happened, but don’t interrogate the child or ask leading questions. This may confuse and fluster the child and make it harder for them to continue their story.
  • Reassure the child that they did nothing wrong. It takes a lot for a child to come forward about abuse. Reassure him or her that you take what is said seriously, and that it is not the child’s fault.
  • Safety comes first. If you feel that your safety or the safety of the child would be threatened if you try to intervene, leave it to the professionals. You may be able to provide more support later after the initial professional intervention.